GWLN
English | Search

We want to hear from our members. Please share insights and experiences about your organization, credit union, and/or community. To submit a blog, simply log in and click on "Add New Blog Post". Remember to select the corresponding category to help members find entries that are most relevant to them.


2014 World Council Survey on Women's Participation in Credit Unions

World Council of Credit Unions conducted a survey on Women's Participation in Credit Unions in 2014.  The data was provided by 36 out of 46 respondents (78%) who were women from national CU associations.

Survey summary:  

  • Average percent of women members of credit unions: 43.8% (34 countries)
  • Average percent of women board members in credit unions: 27.5% (29 countries)
  • Percent of women CEOs of credit unions: 15% (30 countries)

Further details can be found in the Member Services folder of the Resource Library.

2014 WOCCU Survey: Women in CUs

Tags
Challenges Facing Women in Leadership Positions, CU Boards / Volunteers, Impact of Women in Society, Member Service, Program Updates

Jamie Chase

I completely agree. Beyond showing a need, it also presents an opportunity. It was great to hear from the female U.S. CUDE CEOs that attended the African DE program. Their attendance exposed several male attendees to the idea of women CEOs. They were from countries where it was not remotely considered acceptable. (Lisa Brown, CEO of Tallahassee Leon FCU in Florida has a great story about this experience.)

Given that we only know what we are exposed to, our role model as leaders creates new opportunities for women around the world.

Even though we are rooted in "non-discrimination" it is amazing to consider that credit unions  in the United States only offered women the opportunity to obtain loans in their own name in the 1960s. 

The inspiring question here is what are strategies that we can employ to change the culture in coutries where it is not a cultural norm for women to be CEOs.

Jamie Chase

I completely agree. Beyond showing a need, it also presents an opportunity. It was great to hear from the female U.S. CUDE CEOs that attended the African DE program. Their attendance exposed several male attendees to the idea of women CEOs. They were from countries where it was not remotely considered acceptable. (Lisa Brown, CEO of Tallahassee Leon FCU in Florida has a great story about this experience.)

Given that we only know what we are exposed to, our role model as leaders creates new opportunities for women around the world.

Even though we are rooted in "non-discrimination" it is amazing to consider that credit unions  in the United States only offered women the opportunity to obtain loans in their own name in the 1960s. 

The inspiring question here is what are strategies that we can employ to change the culture in coutries where it is not a cultural norm for women to be CEOs.

Rejoice Chisi

this shows that we need to put more women in leadership to improve the percentages

Elube Munthali

I totally agree, its high time that more women should rise and shine
memberLogin




Forgot Password?
Facebook   Twitter   LinkedIn